Rev. Fred M. Enman, S.J.

Rev. Fred M. Enman, S.J. Photo from Worcester Magazine, 1994.

Frederick Enman was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1952 and lived in the city for many years, attending St. Joseph School in Worcester and St. John’s High School in Shrewsbury. He entered the Jesuit novitiate in 1978 and was ordained a Catholic priest in the Society of Jesus in 1988.  He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Wesleyan University (Middletown, Connecticut) in 1975 and in 1978 earned a Juris Doctor from Boston College Law School.  Fr. Fred also holds a Master of Arts degree in Philosophy from Boston College, a Master of Divinity and a Master of Theology from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology and a Diploma of Legal Studies from Oxford University.

In 1988, Fr. Fred founded Matthew 25 with two classmates from Boston College, Tim Healy and Jim MacGillivray.  “When I think back to Matthew 25’s beginnings,” reflects Fr. Fred, “I recall my days in theology studies reading The True Church and the Poor, by Fr. Jon Sobrino, S.J., who wrote about the need to make the values of the gospels concrete.  Matthew 25 becomes concrete when people give food to the hungry, drink to the thirsty, welcome to the stranger, clothes to the naked, comfort to the sick and visits to those in prison.  It struck me very deeply.  All I can say is, be careful what you read.  It can change your life forever!”

Matthew 25 becomes concrete when people give food to the hungry, drink to the thirsty, welcome to the stranger, clothes to the naked, comfort to the sick and visits to those in prison. It struck me very deeply.

Fr. Fred has taught at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, and now divides his time as Executive Director of Matthew 25 and as Assistant Dean and Chaplain of Boston College Law School.  In 1994, Fr. Fred received the Isaac Hecker Award for Social Justice for his work with Matthew 25.  The Knights of Columbus, Crusader Council 2706, honored Fr. Fred with the first John W. Spillane Award for Distinguished Christian Leadership in 2008.

Fr. Fred believes there will always be a need for organizations like Matthew 25 and welcomes the challenge:  “When I was making a retreat in 1996, I remember praying to God, giving thanks for the many wonderful people who had been sent to me through the work of Matthew 25.  I heard this voice inside of me say, ‘And I am going to send you many more.’  I felt very much that this was God talking and providing me encouragement for the work to come.”